What is a background check?

A background check is an investigation into a person’s professional and personal history that validates or disproves their character and identity. A typical background check includes criminal records, education and employment history, civil records, references, and more depending on the situation and individual.
The following are the main types of background checks our team deals in:

Employment background check

Employers run background checks to avoid hiring someone who may pose a threat to the workplace or become a liability to the employer. Seventy-two percent (72%) of employers run a background check for every person they hire.
An employment background check typically takes place when someone applies for a job, but can also happen at any time the employer deems necessary. For example, an employer may require annual or semi-annual drug tests or criminal background checks for their employees to help create a safe and secure workplace.

Criminal background check

A criminal background check is often required in situations where a person or organization needs to know about major criminal activity, including violent or sex crimes, fraud, embezzlement, or felony convictions before making a decision regarding employment, adoption, military enlistment, a firearm purchase, and more.

Credit background check

A credit background check is a record of a person’s credit-to-debt ratio and shows how someone has managed credit and bill payments in the past. Also called a credit report, it’s a standard requirement when applying for a car or home loan, credit card, or any other type of loan.
Many landlords also check credit reports to verify whether a person applying to rent property has a history of good credit and may be more likely to pay rent on time.
Additionally, some jobs require a credit background check, especially for positions in the financial services industry where the employee would manage money, or has access to money on a daily basis.

Personal background check

If you’re interested in seeing what employers see when they run your background check, a personal background check can do that for you. Depending on the service provider, you can choose which checks or searches you want to perform, and which ones you don’t need.
Finding out what shows up on your background check is a great way to address potential errors you find.
It’s common to find mistakes in public information databases, and if you discover and address potential errors before an employer or creditor sees them, you could save yourself from missing out on an opportunity to get a job or borrow money.

Estimation Inquiry